Stinging nettle

Share your creations, hunger, and more.
User avatar
Eugen Canada
Posts: 5191
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2021 2:52 pm
Location: Port Mcnicoll, Ontario
Has thanked: 12325 times
Been thanked: 16486 times
Contact:

Stinging nettle

Post by Eugen »

As you'all know Spring is the season for stinging nettle, and I went to great lengths to establish a little patch on a side of the property. Very rarely found in these parts of Ontario, so I bought seeds online and it took about 3 years to get this patch going.
BB96B24A-2B17-45DA-9F6B-9FDB3B4BE287.jpeg

I'm sharing with you my favourite way of eating it, which is very similar to my favourite way of eating spinach. Here's the recipe. You can change the ingredient quantities accordingly if you want to cook more or less. Note that the nettle stings, so you need to harvest with a garden glove. Best to harvest in the Spring when it's less than 8" high, so it's not stringy and hard.

* 1 lb fresh stinging nettle
* 1.5 ounce flour
* 1.5 ounce butter
* 1/2 quart milk
* 1 or 2 cloves of garlic
* 1 or 2 spoons of sour cream
* salt to taste

Procedure: using rubber gloves, wash the nettle in a large bowl with cold water. Just bathe and throw the water a few times. In a large pot boil about 2" of water from the bottom and drop the nettle in the boiling water just to parch them. As soon as they get soft and that dark green put them through a strainer and let sit on the strainer for a few minutes. Then put the nettle in a smaller pot with about 1.5 ounces of milk and blend with a hand blender.

The sauce is prepared separately. On a pan melt the butter together with the flour on medium heat, and keep steering for about a minute. Careful not to burn the sauce, adjust heat accordingly. Add the rest of the milk slowly while stirring constantly. This is done similarly to a bechamel sauce. Reduce heat and stir for another 4 minutes or so. Add the blended nettle and mix in for about another minute. At the end take off the heat and mix in two spoons of sour cream and the garlic crushed.

Serve with sunny side up eggs. That's my favourite. The flavour is different than anything else I have ever tasted, but good, and amazingly rich in vitamins and minerals.

0AD4C52C-EFCB-4ABB-864D-F4757D4D0074.jpeg


The eggs are from the chickens of Mr Dave. Not sure if they wore their helmets or not, but they make the best eggs ever!
Case 224, 444, 644, 680E
Kubota B26 :blush:
User avatar
RoamingGnome Canada
Posts: 673
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2023 12:54 am
Location: Hamilton, ON
Has thanked: 9551 times
Been thanked: 3437 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by RoamingGnome »

@Eugen - That looks like a very tasty combination :122:
I've never encountered stinging nettles - either in the wild or on a plate, your :writing: made me hungry though - definitely on my bucket list of things to try now... :clap:
'68 Case 195, '84 Case 446, '88 Ingersoll 222 - and 1965 Case 530ck (fullsize backhoe)
User avatar
propane1 Canada
Posts: 2500
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2021 11:32 am
Location: PEI, Canada
Has thanked: 5946 times
Been thanked: 9083 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by propane1 »

I’ve never heard of stinging nettle, not unless you mentioned it last year.

Noel
myerslawnandgarden United States of America
Posts: 244
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2021 12:17 pm
Location: Hinckley, IL
Has thanked: 111 times
Been thanked: 1268 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by myerslawnandgarden »

I wish I could send you some of mine; here in Illinois it is an invasive weed to is the first to take over any neglected land. And yes, you don't want to brush up against it with bare legs or arms. Until it was mentioned on this forum last year, I had never heard of anyone eating it. But many undesirable plants have medicinal properties in the roots, leaves, etc. Recently found that people in the area cook the roots of the burdock plant (which is also plentiful here), who would have thought? Don't know if it grows everywhere, but that's the plant with the nasty cockleburs that get stuck to your clothes come from.

Bob
User avatar
propane1 Canada
Posts: 2500
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2021 11:32 am
Location: PEI, Canada
Has thanked: 5946 times
Been thanked: 9083 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by propane1 »

myerslawnandgarden wrote: Wed May 10, 2023 5:55 pm I wish I could send you some of mine; here in Illinois it is an invasive weed to is the first to take over any neglected land. And yes, you don't want to brush up against it with bare legs or arms. Until it was mentioned on this forum last year, I had never heard of anyone eating it. But many undesirable plants have medicinal properties in the roots, leaves, etc. Recently found that people in the area cook the roots of the burdock plant (which is also plentiful here), who would have thought? Don't know if it grows everywhere, but that's the plant with the nasty cockleburs that get stuck to your clothes come from.

Bob
Yep, have those burdock plants/weeds/nuisance things here. But I’m not a, a cooking burdock roots and eating them. No way. :giggle:

Noel
User avatar
Eugen Canada
Posts: 5191
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2021 2:52 pm
Location: Port Mcnicoll, Ontario
Has thanked: 12325 times
Been thanked: 16486 times
Contact:

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by Eugen »

@myerslawnandgarden Bob, so you don't need I send you any seeds eh? :rofl:

I have tried burdock root. Not tasty. The nettle on the other hand is tastier than spinach. For me at least. Don't forget guys list of you have roots in Europe, and nettle was staple in the old days.

@RoamingGnome I like fiddle heads a lot too. Great idea to grow it in the forest next to us. How do I start it?
Case 224, 444, 644, 680E
Kubota B26 :blush:
JSinMO United States of America
Posts: 1659
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2022 8:16 pm
Location: Missouri
Has thanked: 12618 times
Been thanked: 7292 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by JSinMO »

I remember the conversation on this last year. I wasn’t sure what the plant was. Now I know and I’m with Bob, you can have it all from here! I remember going through patches of that stuff in the woods when I was a kid. The sting is quite annoying! :cuss:

I might try it though, if someone around here knew how to cook it like you. If I try I probably would wind up with a stung tongue! :109: :D
User avatar
RoamingGnome Canada
Posts: 673
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2023 12:54 am
Location: Hamilton, ON
Has thanked: 9551 times
Been thanked: 3437 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by RoamingGnome »

Eugen wrote: Wed May 10, 2023 6:29 pm @RoamingGnome I like fiddle heads a lot too. Great idea to grow it in the forest next to us. How do I start it?
Did some Googling - http://fiddleheadnursery.ca/ they are in Kimberley - near Collingwood and mentioned Asparagus, Stinging Nettles, and Ostrich Ferns (fiddleheads) on their web page

Also - https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-grow-o ... ns-2539638 there were lots of good articles on growing the ferns that produce fiddleheads in the springtime - Important to note that not all wild ferns have edible fronds - some are poisonous - kinda like foraging for mushrooms in the forest - better be 110% certain of what you are picking before it ends up in the cooking pot.

Even though we only have 10 acres there is a good variety of growing conditions - everything from an old beaver meadow with a creek running through it to the forested hillside - it's sandy rocky soil though, it will need a bit of help to be productive - any digging I've done had 3-4 inches of soil/leaf litter and roots, below that was all glacial sand + gravel...
'68 Case 195, '84 Case 446, '88 Ingersoll 222 - and 1965 Case 530ck (fullsize backhoe)
User avatar
Gordy United States of America
Posts: 653
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2021 1:24 pm
Location: MapleLake,MN
Has thanked: 2343 times
Been thanked: 2136 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by Gordy »

JSinMO wrote: Wed May 10, 2023 6:53 pm If I try I probably would wind up with a stung tongue! :109: :D
Just don't nibble on it raw like you do while picking garden produce. NO sting to it once cooked :thumbsup:

:cheers:
Gordy
ckainMich United States of America
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu May 04, 2023 8:44 am
Location: michigan
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: Stinging nettle

Post by ckainMich »

I have been told that the juice in a Burdock leaf will 'cool' Nettle sting very quickly ???
Post Reply